Gender, Sex & Sexuality: KENYA | Escape: Education

Sereya Emily Nchoko, 12, hands over an assignment to teacher, Lorna Nimishoi, while others review school lessons inside a classroom at the Tasaru Safehouse for Girls. The Tasaru Safehouse supports board, lodging and education of young Maasai girls from preteens to late teens who seek refuge from female circumcision and early marriage. Traditionally a young girl is expected to quit school after she is wed in order to perfom her wifely duties such as cooking, cleaning, procreating and caring for the children of her husband's wives. The girls stay at the Safehouse during their school breaks in April, August and December. While they use this time to relax, many still continue to brush up on their studies believing that education will lift them and their families out of poverty. The Tasaru Ntomomok Safehouse for Girls is funded by VDay and UNFPA.
Education, Narok

Sereya Emily Nchoko, 12, hands over an assignment to teacher, Lorna Nimishoi, while others review school lessons inside a classroom at the Tasaru Safehouse for Girls. The Tasaru Safehouse supports board, lodging and education of young Maasai girls from preteens to late teens who seek refuge from female circumcision and early marriage. Traditionally a young girl is expected to quit school after she is wed in order to perfom her wifely duties such as cooking, cleaning, procreating and caring for the children of her husband's wives. The girls stay at the Safehouse during their school breaks in April, August and December. While they use this time to relax, many still continue to brush up on their studies believing that education will lift them and their families out of poverty. The Tasaru Ntomomok Safehouse for Girls is funded by VDay and UNFPA.